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Matthew King
Matthew King

Five Reasons Why You Need To Take Document Security Seriously



I am one of the 30% that was approved the first time. I had all my medical records together, the names of my doctors, hospital, contact information for the doctors, upcoming doctor appointments - that is one of the questions asked - when is your next appointment. Social security wants to make sure you are actively getting medical care. The reasons why you are disabled and can't work. The diagnosis you were given. Social security will check everything out, they will call you and see how you are doing and verify what is on the application. It took me six months, which is pretty normal to find out I had been approved. Social security disability is not an immediate form of income. They will look at any other kinds of income such as time loss if you have a work injury. I was fortunate that I didn't need to hire an attorney, but I understand why people do.




Five Reasons Why You Need To Take Document Security Seriously



He can apply for SSI, which is for those with a lower income. If he applies when he is over 18, then it will only be his monthly income that the SSA takes into consideration. You'll need to provide documentation of his income as well as medical documentation that he meets the Blue Book listing.


DHS recognizes that each jurisdiction is unique and needs flexibility to tailor an exceptions process to meet its individual needs and circumstances. An exceptions process helps states address unique situations where individuals, for reasons beyond their control, are unable to present one or more of the identity documents listed in the regulations. For example, following a natural disaster, for reasons beyond a person's control, documents necessary to establish identity and lawful status may no longer be readily available or obtainable. In such cases, states may need to rely on alternate documents to establish their identity or U.S. citizenship.


DHS understands that some states may currently require presentation, verification, and retention of identity source documents, social security information, and proof of address in a manner that meets the minimum regulatory standards. This also includes meeting the minimum standards for employee background checks, fraudulent document recognition training, and information security and storage requirements. States already meeting these standards do not need to have applicants resubmit identity source documents upon initial application for a compliant document.


The Declaration of Independence is made up of five distinct parts: the introduction; the preamble; the body, which can be divided into two sections; and a conclusion. The introduction states that this document will "declare" the "causes" that have made it necessary for the American colonies to leave the British Empire. Having stated in the introduction that independence is unavoidable, even necessary, the preamble sets out principles that were already recognized to be "self-evident" by most 18th- century Englishmen, closing with the statement that "a long train of abuses and usurpations . . . evinces a design to reduce [a people] under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security." The first section of the body of the Declaration gives evidence of the "long train of abuses and usurpations" heaped upon the colonists by King George III. The second section of the body states that the colonists had appealed in vain to their "British brethren" for a redress of their grievances. Having stated the conditions that made independence necessary and having shown that those conditions existed in British North America, the Declaration concludes that "these United Colonies are, and of Right ought to be Free and Independent States; that they are Absolved from all Allegiance to the British Crown, and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to be totally dissolved."


Chronologically, it is helpful to divide the history of the Declaration after its signing into five main periods, some more distinct than others. The first period consists of the early travels of the parchment and lasts until 1814. The second period relates to the long sojourn of the Declaration in Washington, DC, from 1814 until its brief return to Philadelphia for the 1876 Centennial. The third period covers the years 1877-1921, a period marked by increasing concern for the deterioration of the document and the need for a fitting and permanent Washington home. Except for an interlude during World War II, the fourth and fifth periods cover the time the Declaration rested in the Library of Congress from 1921 to 1952 and in the National Archives from 1952 to the present.


On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. On December 23, the Declaration and the Constitution were removed from the shrine and placed between two sheets of acid-free manilla paper. The documents were then carefully wrapped in a container of all-rag neutral millboard and placed in a specially designed bronze container. It was late at night when the container was finally secured with padlocks on each side. Preparations were resumed on the day after Christmas, when the Attorney General ruled that the Librarian needed no "further authority from the Congress or the President" to take such action as he deemed necessary for the "proper protection and preservation" of the documents in his charge.


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